Tehanetorens is a master storyteller in the Mohawk tradition and also author of Legends of the Iroquois and Wampum Belts. During his lifelong career as a teacher, he established youth groups at Akwesasne to promote native values and served as president of the Indian Defense League of America. He founded the Six Nations Indian Museum in 1954 to serve as a cultural center for tribal people in the Six Nations region.

  • In Legends of the Iroquois, Tehanetorens (Ray Fadden, Mohwak) presents ancient stories both in pictographs and accompanied by English translations. Pictographs were the original writing system used by many Native American and First Nations peoples and could be symbols of physical objects or concepts. A brief summary of the Great Peace upon which Iroquois culture is founded, along with a key to Six Nations pictographs, the symbols of the Six Nations and that of their clans prelude the stories. Fourteen tales explore the Iroquois culture and teach lessons of loyalty, bravery, and kindness. Also included is a full biography of Tehanetorens and his contributions to the Haudenosaunee. About the Author: Tehanetorens (Ray Fadden) was a master storyteller in the Mohawk tradition. During his lifelong career as a teacher, he established youth groups at Akwesasne to promote Native values and served as president of the Indian Defense League of America. In 1954 he founded the Six Nations Indian Museum near Onchiota, New York, to serve as a cultural center for tribal people in the Six Nations region. He passed away in November 2008 at age 98.
  • The book Roots of the Iroquois traces the origins of the Haudenosaunee people including the story of the Great Peace that united the powerful Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Seneca nations under the Iroquois Confederacy. Through this confederacy, the principles of democracy were engraved in the hearts of Iroquois men and women long before the first white settlers arrived in America. Tehanetorens recounts speeches from their great chiefs, and documents the Confederacy’s relationship with white settlers, including the impact of Christianity and that of the American Revolutionary and French and English wars. About the author: Tehanetorens (Ray Fadden) was a master storyteller in the Mohawk tradition. During his lifelong career as a teacher, he established youth groups at Akwesasne to promote Native values and served as president of the Indian Defense League of America. In 1954 he founded the Six Nations Indian Museum near Onchiota, New York, to serve as a cultural center for tribal people in the Six Nations region. He passed away in November 2008 at age 98.
  • Sacred Song of the Hermit Thrush is a childrens picture and text book based on a Hodinöhsö:ni’ story. Long ago, when the birds had no songs, only man could sing. When the Great Spirit walked on the Earth, he noticed a great silence. He realized the birds had no songs. He devised a great game and told the birds who ever could fly the highest, would receive a very beautiful song. But not all the birds were honest. In his desire to win the game, the small hermit thrush jumped on the back of the great eagle. The eagle flew higher than any of the birds, but when he came back to land, the Great Spirit said the hermit thrush had gone the highest since he was on the eagle’s back. Hermit thrush was awarded a beautiful song, but in his shame for not being honest, he flew into the deep woods. To this day, you may hear the lovely song of the hermit thrush, but you may not ever see him. About the Author: Tehanetorens–Ray Fadden was a teacher and influential figure among the Mohawks of Akwesasne. The Mohawk Nation adopted him into the Mohawk wolf clan and gave him the name Tehanetorens, which has been translated as “He Walks through the Pines.” In 1930, Ray became one of the first teachers at the St. Regis Mohawk School in Hogansburg, New York. He published a series of articles that detailed the many contributions the North American Indian had made to modern civilization, ranging from technological innovations to foodstuffs and even democratic traditions. Ray passed away in November 2008, at the age of 98. Illustrations by John Fadden.
  • In Wampum Belts of The Iroquois, learn about over four dozen sacred Iroquois Wampum Belts and Strings, along with descriptions of the meaning of each piece and the greater instruction from the Peacemaker that accompanied the Belt. The Wampum, originally created from shells and porcupine quills, was introduced at the time of the founding of the League of the Five Nations by Hiawatha. Used for generations as jewelry and decorations, the Wampum came to be regarded as something sacred and was used on official occasions as well as for religious ceremonies. Guided by teacher Tehanetorens, students of the Indian Way School at Akwesasne Mohawk Nation present over four dozen authentic, bead-for-bead replicas of sacred Iroquois Wampum Belts and Strings, along with descriptions of the meaning of each piece and the greater instruction from the Peacemaker that accompanied the Belt.

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