• These beautifully made beaded girl shoes were created by Heather Cooper from the Seneca Nation. These heirloom shoes would make a great gift idea for the special little girl in your life.
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    This Heather Cooper- Beaded Butterfly Necklace also has the silhouette of two wolves in the center. Made with glass seed beads. Heather Cooper is a bead worker from the Seneca Nation.
  • KT Orange Peyote Stitch Earrings. Kristina Tome "I am currently attending the University of Buffalo for Masters in Critical Museum Sciences. I received my Bachelor in Fine Arts. I have shown my work around Western New York. Seneca Nation Cultural Center/Museum, Cayuga Museum, Roswell Park, Burchfield Penny Arts Center. 1st place – Seneca Nation Cultural Center Fall 2018 Beaded Strawberry necklace. I create art to make people happy. My work lately has been focused on missing, exploited and murdered indigenous women. I create these pieces in oils on large canvases. This issue has become a main focus in my paintings. I also create beadwork. My beaded pieces that I focus on are beaded strawberries necklaces and earrings."
  • Light Blue Peyote Stitch Keychain Examples of peyote stitch have been found in artifacts from Ancient Egypt, and the stitch has also been used in historic and contemporary Native American beadwork. The name "peyote stitch" derives from the use of this stitch to decorate objects used in peyote ceremonies by members of a number of Native American Nations. The peyote stitch, also known as the gourd stitch, is an off-loom bead weaving technique. Peyote stitch may be worked with either an even or an odd number of beads per row. Both even and odd count peyote pieces can be woven as flat strips, in a flat round shape, or as a tube.
  • Orange Souvenir Beaded Bird Glass beads were highly valued by the First Nations because they were durable and came in a wide variety of colors. Before glass beads arrived on the scene in the 1500s, the First Nations were accustomed to using pieces of bone, shell or rock to adorn their clothing. Quillwork using dyed porcupine quills was also popular. European fashion and trends in decoration influenced the Haudenosaunee to adapt their ancient beading skills, their glass beads, and their tribal themes to Victorian preferences and tastes. They began to make "whimsies" - beaded birds, pincushions, picture frames, match holders, boxes, purses and trinkets to sell at or near Niagara Falls, and at other sites near their communities, at state fairs, train stations and public events. This became an important source of income for Haudenosaunee families.
  • Red/Pink Peyote Stitch Keychain Examples of peyote stitch have been found in artifacts from Ancient Egypt, and the stitch has also been used in historic and contemporary Native American beadwork. The name "peyote stitch" derives from the use of this stitch to decorate objects used in peyote ceremonies by members of a number of Native American Nations. The peyote stitch, also known as the gourd stitch, is an off-loom bead weaving technique. Peyote stitch may be worked with either an even or an odd number of beads per row. Both even and odd count peyote pieces can be woven as flat strips, in a flat round shape, or as a tube.

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